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TEXTO CURATORIAL

CURATORIAL TEXT BY LUCAS BENATTI

Liane Abdalla's nature does not just refer to natural nature, or the presence of pure traits, untouched by culture. The nature of your work is also a way of saying about yourself, it is nature understood as someone's particular traits, as essence, as personality, as that which is unique and personal.

It is not just an opposition or denial of natural nature, but a search or a process of reunion with this nature, which refers to what is characteristic of itself. This procedure is evident in her series “Forests”, in which the artist recreates scenes and landscapes of forests and trees with small dots. This is a task that requires a contemplative, slowed-down temporality. The image is formed little by little, in these meetings of small parts. The whole is just an impression (as in a hark back to impressionist art).

The deposit of paint with the dot, this first formal element, the smallest indivisible particle, the origin of the other forms, expresses the artist's search for the essence of things. A point will forever be a point, as there is nothing that precedes it. Understanding this genesis is important for Liane Abdalla's work, who will revive this search at other times, such as in her works that refer to Brazilian archeology, and the ancestral world of paintings and graphics. It is a return to the subject, but also a historical return to the genesis of artistic production.

This procedure is also very well explored in his series “In Natura”. Like this nomadic artist who returns to the origins of human expression, Liane Abdalla decides to create and compose with the things she finds along her path, incorporating dry leaves, twigs, seeds, etc. into her works. The end result of this procedure reminds me of cubist collages.

In her series of landscape paintings, the artist approaches a dreamlike language, introducing a mechanism for accessing the unconscious, in the lesser-known layers of the Self. These are dreams, fantasies, perhaps delusions that allow themselves to detach themselves from reality and concreteness. to live (and experience) horizons of possibilities.

Still linked to mental structures and thoughts, I visualize in your series “Lines” an encounter with concrete experiences and life trajectories. The images of the grooves of the trees, which reveal their time and history, or the paths of the waters of a river, are also analogies to the artist's journey and life story, and the construction of her Self.

In Liane Abdalla's art, nature is a path, a bridge for the artist to find and tell her own story. It's less a literal reading about trees, flowers and landscapes, and more about what these elements can indicate about your trajectory, your personality.

Curator Lucas Benatti

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